Starting School With Food Allergies

swing-1188131_960_720

It’s that bittersweet time! Your son or daughter is finally old enough to start school. Sending your child to school for the first time can be an emotional and hectic experience, especially if they have food allergies. The same goes for sending your child back to school for the second or third time. Releasing your child into the care of others and outside of your full supervision is already a huge change that can feel groundless, and if your child has food allergies, there are that many more things to worry about. 1 out of every 13 American children suffer from food allergies, on average that’s 2 per classroom. The silver lining in that fact is that food allergies are not a completely foreign concept to most schools and many have guidelines in place for dealing with food allergic students.

Continue Reading

Food allergies vs. Food sensitivities

peanut-butter-jelly-881197_960_720 copy

This very helpful article below from Dr. Frank Lipman talks about the difference between food allergies and food sensitivities (aka intolerances), in particular with reference to kids. Both are immune system responses and both are on the rise. Learn about what they mean and what to look out for.

Food Allergy versus Food Sensitivity: What You Need to Know

Robyn O’Brien June 26

It’s Food Allergy Awareness Week this week.  In the early years of this work, when we first began speaking about food allergies, people used to look at you like you were making it up.  How could a child be allergic to food?  And since when?  As kids, we ate PB&Js and had cartons of milk for lunch at school. They weren’t loaded weapons on a lunchroom table.  What’s changed?  And why has it changed so fast? 

Continue Reading

New Study Gives Kids with Peanut Allergies Some Relief

peanutsFrom the Wall Street Journal

Many children with peanut allergies who were fed small but escalating amounts of peanut flour were eventually able to eat a significant quantity of peanuts with no reaction, a new study has found.

Six months after the treatment started, more than 80% of the children in the trial could safely eat the equivalent of five peanuts a day. That is at least 25 times the quantity of peanut protein that they could tolerate before the therapy. 

Continue Reading