A Dietitian’s Favorite Spring Fruits & Veggies

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These days, it may seem that you can get any produce at any time of the year—grapes from Chile in December, strawberries from Florida in February, tomatoes grown year-round in hot houses. Eating seasonally, though, can help you eat local foods, reduce your carbon footprint, save money and the biggest bonus of all—fresh food is more nutritious and tastes better! Produce starts to lose nutrients and flavor after picking so the sooner it is eaten, the more nutritious and tasty, plus when produce travels long distances there is the chance of quality degradation and spoilage.

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The Truth about Starchy Vegetables

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Starchy vegetables have made it onto many dieters’ blacklists lately. Let’s have a look at why and whether this is justified.

All vegetables have at least a small amount of carbohydrates. So-called “starchy” vegetables typically contain about 3 times the amount of non-starchy vegetables and therefore about 3 times the number of calories. Some examples of common starchy vegetables include beans, corn, green peas, parsnips, plantains, white potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, squash and pumpkin.

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